Posts Tagged ‘cake’

Sweet & Saucy Shop’s First Ever Demo Day!

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Last Sunday, Sweet & Saucy Shop’s team of cake instructors hosted a day of cake demos for a lovely group of ladies from all over SoCal. Though we have been hosting hands-on classes for years, this was the first time we have offered demos and overall it was a lovely day of caking, socializing and snacking. The day started in the morning with our head decorator, Kyong Bell, demonstrating how to hand-paint some Rifle Paper Co. inspired florals and faces on a 3-tiered cake topped with matching wafer paper flowers.

 

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Kyong started with a blank 3-tiered canvas with a petal-shaped bottom tier. Next she expertly mixes edible paints and starts painting her florals.

 

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The finished hand-painted cake complete with Rifle Paper Co. inspired wafer paper flowers. Can you guess who Kyong used as inspiration for her painted faces?

 

The next demo was by Frances Mencias, master buttercream decorator. She demoed how to apply petals to create Sweet & Saucy Shop’s signature garden rose cake.

 

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Frances has completed dozens of garden rose cakes since she started working in our buttercream department. You can see her expertly place her petals to create the perfect garden rose.

 

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Next, Kasey Loya demoed hand-lettering and calligraphy for cakes. Students learned how to paint in a variety of colors and metallics and how to transfer and paint some nearly perfect lettering.

 

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As many of you already know, Sweet & Saucy Shop has recently launched a website devoted completely to cake and dessert classes both in-store and online, Sugar Schoolhouse (www.sugarschoolhouse.com). There are many PDF tutorials already listed for sale with more on the way. We will also be putting together a calendar of future classes and posting it on Sugar Schoolhouse’s website shortly. We hope to see you all in one of our future classes! Bye for now!

 

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy: Circular Ruffle Cake

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Well hello there! Fall’s here and we’re just loving wearing sweaters again! We hope that wherever you are, you’re enjoying the beautiful autumn weather as much as we are!

This post, Kaytee is here to show you how to put together this little beauty:

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First you make my darkest color of fondant, as this is an ombre cake, and to get the lighter colors, you progressively add white. Then you roll it through the pasta machine to a 3.IMG_20141010_105121

You take out my circle cutter and select the size you wish to use, cutting out circles and covering them and the remainder with cellophane. We do this with fondant and gum paste in order to prevent it from drying out.IMG_20141010_105455 Then you place my circle on my foam pad. IMG_20141010_105325We use these pads with a ball tool, most often with sugar flowers, to thin out the edges of the petals. In this case, we use it like we do for other ruffles, applying pressure half on the edge of the fondant, and half on the pad. Make sure not to press too hard, as you will tear through.IMG_20141010_105334 Then you crumple the circle from the center.IMG_20141010_105352 And then you apply it to the buttercream.IMG_20141010_105409 Then you continue with the rest of the circles you cut, going up the cake, and over.
IMG_20141010_134002And voila! There’s a very simple ruffle cake, you can make at home!MG_1795

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy: Basketball Cake

Saturday, October 18th, 2014

Well hello! This post, we’re talking about a carved basketball cake that Kaytee made the other week. This was a 25 serving basketball for a University of Kentucky Wildcats fan. Kaytee’s here to show you how she got to this result.

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First – and a few days in advance of working on the cake –  I cover the cake drum with shortening to adhere the fondant wood strips. I place beige fondant down and measure out even, wide strips and lightly cut into them with my boning tool. To paint the wood grain, I use gel color diluted with vodka and a wide round brush. As we’ve discussed, vodka thins out paint, but we also use it to remove unwanted paint smudges from fondant. So when painting wood grain, this removal comes as an advantage, since the brush is simultaneously applying and removing the color in the patterns we choose.IMG_20141009_135534

Next, I cut out the letters from fondant, allowing them to dry beforehand.IMG_20141009_152355

Then, when the cakes have been baked and cooled down, I stack the layers on top of each other, carving around before crumb coating.

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Then when I have my approximate shape figured out, I fill between the layers. I place the cake on a 6″ board, so that it’s easier to transfer onto the pre-fondanted board once the cake is covered. Also, since it’s a cake with more than 4 layers, we use a cake board in the middle and dowel it for structure. I crumb coated both the to and the bottom of the cake separately, making sure to get buttercream all around, sealing in the crumbs. IMG_20141009_110335

While the cake is setting up, I mix up my color. I use a mixture of modeling chocolate and fondant to allow me more time to work with it without it drying.IMG_20141009_102335

Here’s what the cake looks like once I put the top cake on the bottom. I then frost the entirety with Swiss meringue buttercream.IMG_20141009_110621

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I then put the cake back in the fridge, allowing the buttercream to set up. Then I put on gloves and smooth the hardened buttercream with the heat of my hands.IMG_20141009_132913

Then I cover the cake with the fondant/modeling chocolate mix, smoothing with my hands and corn starch. I immediately put a dowel in on both sides of the ball, to stabilize the cake, filling in the dowel holes with fondant. IMG_20141009_140432

At this point, I transfer the cake onto the board I have pre-covered. Then I use an impression mat to give the cake its basketball texture.IMG_20141009_141825

Then I use a ball tool to indent the lines.IMG_20141009_143358

I put the cake back in the fridge, and then I turn my attention to the edible images I’m using for the logos. I roll out a very thin piece of white fondant, apply water and place the image down, cutting around it with an x-acto knife. In case you’ve not worked with edible images, we use them on white fondant when the background color isn’t white, as the background color will show through otherwise. But on plain white buttercream, it’s totally fine to apply it directly. Remember to use edible ink, or have a professional printer do it for you using edible ink. Otherwise you will have to warn your clients that they will be ingesting inedible (though non-toxic) ink.IMG_20141009_150539
I steam the cake before applying the edible images, as the water will destroy them. I apply the letters I had onto the board.IMG_20141009_152604

Then I paint in the lines I had indented, using gel color diluted with vodka.IMG_20141009_154526

And there you go! Your very own basketball cake! These techniques can be used for almost any other ball shaped cake, so feel free to improvise with your own soccer ball cake (though you’re on your own for getting those pentagons and hexagons just right!) haha ;) IMG_20141009_155832

 

See you next time!!

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy: Oldsmobile Carved Cake

Saturday, October 4th, 2014

Well hello there! Every few months, we get requests for carved car cakes – usually for grooms’ cakes. They often are classic cars, such as Monte Carlo’s or Chevy’s. This post, we’re talking about a carved caked that Kasey made a few weeks back, which was a 1960′s Oldsmobile. She did such a great job with it, that we wanted to share with you how she did, step by step!

Here’s the final result: Photo Aug 23, 11 46 29 AM

Now let’s get to it!

First thing, there is some math involved in our car cakes. Luckily, car specs are easily found on the internet, so it’s simply a matter of scaling them down depending upon the amount of servings required.

For our car cakes, we have supports built for us out of Masonite boards, allowing there to be room underneath, like a real car.

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Then Kasey builds the layers on top of it, filling it as she goes. Then she crumb coats it, placing it in the fridge to set up.

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At this point, Kasey cuts out spots for the wheels.

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Then she frosts the cake, finding the shape underneath the buttercream.

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Kasey then covers the cake with a mix of modeling chocolate and fondant. We use the mix to allow more time for the fondant not to dry on the cake. This gives more possibilities to have a seamless cover. She then extrudes fondant small enough to wrap around the edges of the car’s details.

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She then cuts out the spaces for the lights and grill, filling them in with black fondant.

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She adds details (excellently, might I add!).Photo Aug 22, 8 52 41 PM

She then fills the seat area with beige fondant – it Is a convertible, after all! And then adds silver paint to the details and grills.Photo Aug 23, 9 00 25 AM

She makes tires out of rice krispie and white chocolate, covering them in black fondant and painting the details in silver. She makes a tiny license plate (so cute!).Photo Aug 22, 3 01 08 PM

Then uses a fine point brush to finish the rest of the details.Photo Aug 23, 11 46 09 AM

She covers the board with black fondant and then she takes floral wire and attaches it to the back with a fondant bunting banner, painted on with gel colors diluted with vodka. Then she steams it for gloss.Photo Aug 23, 11 47 01 AMAnd voila! Here’re the final shots!

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See you next time!!

 

 

 

Behind the Scenes @Sweet & Saucy Shop: Kyong’s Wafer Paper Trio

Saturday, September 27th, 2014

Hey there! How’s the beginning of fall treating you? Us, we’re suuuuper busy! The beginning of fall brings us tolerable temperatures, and everyone’s rushing to get their weddings in before it gets too cold, so we’ve been working our buns off!

So anyway, to the important stuff… This week, we’ve got a special treat:

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Though, we slightly misled you by the title; we’re not showing you a full step-by-step of all three cakes. However, we are going to show you some tricks Kyong used to create these beauties.

These are the sketches Kyong designed for the clients.

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Then, upon finding out which designs the client has chosen, we all made wafer paper flowers the weekend before, having learned from Stevi Auble on Craftsy.

IMG_20140822_230527Kyong made leaves by wrapping flower wire with floral tape, creating little branches, upon which she affixed the leaves she cut out from wafer paper, using piping gel.

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Since these cakes awere all styrofoam dummy cakes, this allowed Kyong to work on them at her leisure, as opposed to worrying about buttercream melting. After covering the dummies with fondant, here are some fun things she did!

For the middle cake, the edges were crimped. We use clamp-like crimping tools, and there are a variety of shapes one can choose. Kyong went with the scalloped look. Later, she wet the edges and attached gold leaf only to the crimped parts.

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IMG_20140808_204906For the cake on the right hand side, Kyong used Martha Stewart paper cutters to achieve the doily look in between tiers, using very thin fondant.

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IMG_20140830_195028For the cute little ropes, she extruded black and white fondant into thin tubes, then coiled them around each other.

IMG_20140830_195201She traced the line on the cake with piping gel, where she wanted the rope. Then, she attached the black and white rope to the cake.

IMG_20140830_194822She made little loops and attached them as so:

IMG_20140830_194917Isn’t it the cutest!?

IMG_20140830_194929She attached the wafer paper flowers to the cakes using melted modeling chocolate, as we use frequently.

She used a combination of these techniques on these cakes, and we can’t get enough of them! Hope they help inspire you for your future cake endeavors!

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IMG_20140902_204059Til next time!

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy Shop: How to Make a Bow

Sunday, September 14th, 2014

Hey there! This post in inspired by Kasey’s students. Kasey, one of our decorators, is teaching fondant classes (if you’re interested in attending, please email info@sweetandsaucyshop.com), and her students expressed great interest in how she made bows out of fondant. We make bows with such frequency, that it’s often easy to forget that at one point, we didn’t know how to make them either!

So here we go, and Kasey has taken pictures to show you the step-by-step.

First, we take a little blob of fondant.

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You then roll the fondant out with a rolling pin.

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We use a mechanical pasta machine, thereby rolling out the fondant completely evenly.

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If you don’t have a strip cutter that cuts in parallel on both sides, you use a transparent ruler and measure out both sides evenly, cutting them at your desired width.

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What you see below, is a pre-formed bow former, made of rolled up paper towel wrapped in masking tape. This can be made with anything, provided you’ve made yourself a round object around which the fondant can dry. Then you wrap your fondant around this former, and you cut just past where the fondant rolls over, allowing room to make a crease, as you’ll see below. Repeat for the other side.

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When you are making the creases, you fold the edges into each other three or so times. Using water to adhere it to itself.

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Repeat on the other edge.

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Then seal them together over the bow former with water.

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Repeat with the other piece of fondant you have cut.

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Touch both ends with water, and attach to each other.

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Cut a smaller piece of fondant, approximately half the width of the bow sides, run water along a side, then create a crease in itself.

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You then lay it over the joined pieces of bow.

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Flip the bow upside down, then pull the loose ends onto each other, sealing with water.

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And voila! There you have yourself a bow! Allow to air dry completely for a day or two, and it can be placed wherever you like. We like to use melted white chocolate to adhere them to fondant cakes.

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Have a great day!


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