Posts Tagged ‘fondant’

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy: Circular Ruffle Cake

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Well hello there! Fall’s here and we’re just loving wearing sweaters again! We hope that wherever you are, you’re enjoying the beautiful autumn weather as much as we are!

This post, Kaytee is here to show you how to put together this little beauty:

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First you make my darkest color of fondant, as this is an ombre cake, and to get the lighter colors, you progressively add white. Then you roll it through the pasta machine to a 3.IMG_20141010_105121

You take out my circle cutter and select the size you wish to use, cutting out circles and covering them and the remainder with cellophane. We do this with fondant and gum paste in order to prevent it from drying out.IMG_20141010_105455 Then you place my circle on my foam pad. IMG_20141010_105325We use these pads with a ball tool, most often with sugar flowers, to thin out the edges of the petals. In this case, we use it like we do for other ruffles, applying pressure half on the edge of the fondant, and half on the pad. Make sure not to press too hard, as you will tear through.IMG_20141010_105334 Then you crumple the circle from the center.IMG_20141010_105352 And then you apply it to the buttercream.IMG_20141010_105409 Then you continue with the rest of the circles you cut, going up the cake, and over.
IMG_20141010_134002And voila! There’s a very simple ruffle cake, you can make at home!MG_1795

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy: Hipster Mermaid Photoshoot Cake

Sunday, October 26th, 2014

Well hello there! We’ve had some excitement around the bakery lately, namely that a photoshoot we got to work on was featured on Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan AND Buzzfeed! And today is your chance to learn how the cake that was designed for that photoshoot was made, so you can have your very own mermaid cake! For context, we were asked to work with Your Cloud Parade on a photoshoot involving Traci Hines, AKA Hipster Little Mermaid. Kaytee took the task upon her and came up with a few designs based on a color palette and some photos. Once a design was decided upon, Kaytee went to work.

Here’s the finished product.

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Kaytee: So first things first, this was a dummy cake, so the time constraints on it were basically nonexistent. I say that to let you know that it was all styrofoam cake, and I worked on this over several weeks, so the regular timeline one would expect for making decorations, etc… was very flexible, as opposed to if you are working with a real cake.

Here are the sketches I drew that Melody decided to go with. She liked the idea of the tail wrapping around, but wanting to incorporate the shells, I mashed the two together.IMG_20140823_160011Once the design was figured out, I started off by cutting out a ton of circles of that beautiful shade of green fondant, wrapping them and putting them in the fridge, allowing them to maintain their flexibility.

IMG_20140823_163153 Then once I had all the tiers covered in white fondant and stacked, I began applying the circles, overlapping them so they give the look of scales (staggered in half increments).IMG_20140823_165833When I was ready to start working on the cake itself, I covered the top of the top tier in a circle of green fondant. Because I wanted to have the effect where it looks like scales were coming out of the white fondant, I cut into it. I then cut the tops of the circles (because the white fondant was hard and wasn’t allowing me to play with it) to fit into it, so it would appear to be coming from within the cake. If you were to repeat this with a real cake, you would theoretically have freshly applied fondant, which you would then be able to lift and tuck under as needed.

IMG_20140823_172152 I then began placing the scales along the bottom, creating the end of the tail. I made sure to make it thin, and cut the sides of the circles accordingly. IMG_20140829_154339 Here are progress shots.IMG_20140829_165353 I went up the second tier, widening the tail as I went.IMG_20140829_165357 Then I joined it with the top tier.IMG_20140829_165410

IMG_20140829_165417 Then I rolled out a lighter shade of green and cut out the shape of a tail fin, attaching it to the cake using melted white chocolate and freeze-sprayed to hold immediately.IMG_20140829_170219 I deepened the grooves of the fin using a small ball tool.IMG_20140829_170657Annnnnnnd here’s the moment when I show you that though we are exceptional human beings, we cake decorators sometimes make mistakes, and a lot of our job involves MacGuyvering our ways into something beautiful. So, for this cake, I thought I would use a gold strip doodad for the lines, which had worked very well for a semi-rustic marbled cake a while ago. While that machine worked for that cake, the results were too imprecise for what I wanted for this cake. So you see below, that is pre-fixing gold striping. Also, those are the shells I cut out of coral fondant and placed on the cake. I began with white painting in the crevices, later deciding gold was more appropriate.
IMG_20140830_122531This is the gold having been touched up with gold powder paint.IMG_20140903_141521After painting the gold, I applied pearl shine to the scales with pearl dust and vodka.

IMG_20140903_152819 Here is the gold in the shells. Much better choice, isn’t it?IMG_20140903_173849And here you are! These are the pictures of the cake used in the photoshoot, and I couldn’t be more proud! The pictures are gorgeous, as are the models. Everything was beautiful and I feel so fortunate to have been part of it.

Photos-Mark-Brooke-Photography-Mathieu-PhotoMark Brooke Photography & Mathieu Photo

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Photos-Mark-Brooke-Photography-Mathieu-Photo (6)Mark Brooke Photography & Mathieu Photo

Photos-Mark-Brooke-Photography-Mathieu-Photo (5)Mark Brooke Photography & Mathieu Photo

 

Until next time!

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy: Beehive Cake

Sunday, August 24th, 2014

Hey there! Hope you’ve been enjoying this series. We all have, on our side. It’s so great to be able to share our knowledge with you folks.

This post is a wee bit less complicated than last time’s In-N-Out Burger cake. It’s an adorable, pretty simple, two-tiered buttercream cake, resembling a beehive; this is a perfect infant birthday cake, or even for the kid in you who thinks faces on little things never get old (they don’t for us, either). It is a collaboration with Kaytee in fondant, and Frances in buttercream.

Here’s the finished product:

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So let’s get started. First off, Kaytee makes the little bees, so they have time to dry before they play around their little home.

She pulls out some yellow fondant and rolls out little oblong balls.

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Then she rolls out black fondant, cutting it into thin strips and adhering them to the yellow shape.

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Then, she rolls out white fondant and, using a mini rose petal cutter, cuts out wings, adhering them with water.

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Afterwards, she uses black flower stamens for the antennae, poking them in with water. Then, she takes a tiny bristled brush and paints on little faces, using gel colors diluted with vodka.

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For the flying bees, she takes floral wire (18 gauge) and bends the end into a little loop. She then dips the loop into water and stabs it into the bottom of the bees she wants to have flying, squishing the entry point to seal it. The loop allows space for the fondant to become an adhesive to itself with the water inside. Then, these guys get set aside until the cake is set up.

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Now onto the buttercreaming. First, Frances dyes her buttercream with gel colors to get to the shade the client wants.

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Then she takes the crumb-coated cake out of the fridge and frosts it with the buttercream using a piping bag.

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She then lightly presses her mini offset spatula into the frosting while turning the turntable, slowly raising it, so as to leave indents in a loose coil fashion. Then she cuts dowels to fit and places them in the bottom tier, small enough to fit underneath the cake board on the second tier, but wide enough to provide support. She then repeats the process with the second tier.

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She applies a fondant doorway, then she uses a deeper shade of yellow to make a pearl border around the bottoms of both tiers.

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And then she applies the bees, which stick to the buttercream itself.

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And there you have it! A simple and cute twist on a cake that you can make easily at home!

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Thanks for joining us again, and see you next time!

 

 

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy: Pirate Cake

Friday, August 8th, 2014

Hey there! This post, we’ll be discussing this cute pirate themed cake. It’s a pretty simple design, with some semi-complicated accents, that altogether give a totally fun and professional look!

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So here’s how we do it!

As you might remember from our previous posts, we like to make our decorations beforehand, so as to allow them time to dry.

Kaytee starts with the treasure chest: she uses Rice Krispies and white chocolate. She doesn’t worry about it being perfectly straight or flat, as it is supposed to be an ancient chest, after all.

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Then, she takes the brown fondant and rolls it over the wood grain impression mat, then places it on the rice krispie, adhering it with shortening. She takes gold colored fondant and attaches it to the brown fondant using water.

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Then to make the coins, she uses the back of a piping tip to make the shape, then impresses them with the inside of a big piping tip. She then paints them with copper color.

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The finishing touches are to add the coins to the chest, and the top of the chest, using white chocolate and freeze spray. She props up the top using toothpicks.

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For the skull, she cuts white fondant out in the desired shape, adheres black fondant to it, then wraps it and puts it in the fridge, so that it will still be malleable a few days later, when the cake will be assembled.

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The final decoration is the map. She rolls out tan colored fondant, curls up the edges, then paints on it using gel colors. This also gets put in the fridge to await assembly day. However, in order not to have saran wrap glued to the sticky surface, this gets put inside a cake pan, then wrapped.

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We’re going to go through the buttercreaming process as well. Emily is our buttercreamer for this cake, and she shows us how we buttercream our cakes here at Sweet & Saucy. We fill our cakes, using Swiss meringue buttercream as a dam around the edges. Then when the cake is filled and set up, we use piping bags to frost. We fill the bag with Swiss, cut the tip, then hold it in place while squeezing out the buttercream and turning the cake on her turntable. Once the cake is covered, she uses her offset spatula to flatten the top, then uses a flat edged scraper to smooth the side. Once the sides are smooth, the tops will require pushing in with her offset again.

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Then the cake gets put in the fridge, allowing it to set, usually overnight.

 

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Kasey takes over the next steps. She rolls out red fondant super thin, as they will become stripes on the bottom tier. She uses the metal pasta strip cutter to get even stripes.

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Then she attaches the remaining decorations to the cake, using water and white chocolate with freeze spray as adherents.

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pirate (15)And voila!

 

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy Shop: Pororo Cake How-to

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Hey there, welcome to a new series we’re starting up, where our cake decorators share with you the ins and outs of one of their favorite cakes of the week. We’re really excited to show you what goes on behind the scenes!

This post, Kaytee shares with you the makings of a cute little cake featuring Pororo the Little Penguin, a South Korean cartoon character. She chose to feature this cake because we Sweet & Saucy decorators love cute animal toppers (especially when they’re wearing aviator caps! What?! Ahh!), and any excuse to highlight them is definitely welcome. So here goes. Enjoy!

Here’s the final product:

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Now let’s see how we get there!

To begin, here’s a trade secret: when we make those toppers you folks love, a lot of the time, they’re made of Rice Krispie squares. Fondant is really quite heavy, so this allows us to have elaborate toppers without damaging the cake supporting them. So first, we mash the squares into the shape we want:

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Then, we cover the shape with melted white chocolate:

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After this, we’ll shave off the extra bumps. Sometimes – if we’re feeling particular about the shape being very smooth – we’ll cover it in modelling chocolate.

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Then I cover the ball in red modelling chocolate. I choose modeling chocolate for this particular topper because of its flexibility and ability to cover seams using your own body heat through your fingers.

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Then I do the same with the remaining shapes.

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You’ll notice that there is a skewer going through all the parts in the picture above; this ensures that the topper is secure. The skewer also goes through the styrofoam, much like it will in the cake, in order to hold the topper up, in its place.

Then, I add the details, using water to adhere them to each other.

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Another neat thing about modeling chocolate is that it hardens when cold. So I make the wings out of modeling chocolate, then freeze spray them to keep them in the desired position. I use chocolate brown petal dust to fill in the creases on the cap.

Then for the rainbow, I roll out pretty thin red fondant. Since it’s the top of the rainbow color, I want to use it as the base. I roll out thicker bands of each color, then cut them uniformly, using a metal pasta strip cutter that has been a lifesaver back here. Each band is adhered to the base using water.

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Once the cake has been buttercreamed and is sufficiently hardened, it’s time to put the decorations on, and voila! You now have a Pororo cake! Look at that cute little guy!

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Celebration Cakes!

Friday, April 23rd, 2010

Here’s another fun filled post with photos of some recent celebration cakes we’ve done.  We absolutely love making baby shower cakes!  Both clients wanted somewhat elegant/modern cakes, but still with a fun baby theme!

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The second cake was actually made for some family friends of ours and we are so happy for them as they have their first baby girl!

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The last of the celebration cakes was a fun request that we loved making!  One of our clients wanted to surprise his wife with an 80′s themed cake for her birthday and so we ran with it!  Kyong, one of my new assistants made all the decorations for this cake and she definitely hit it spot on!

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Bring back any memories…


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