Posts Tagged ‘modeling chocolate’

Behind the Scenes @ Sweet & Saucy Shop: Pororo Cake How-to

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Hey there, welcome to a new series we’re starting up, where our cake decorators share with you the ins and outs of one of their favorite cakes of the week. We’re really excited to show you what goes on behind the scenes!

This post, Kaytee shares with you the makings of a cute little cake featuring Pororo the Little Penguin, a South Korean cartoon character. She chose to feature this cake because we Sweet & Saucy decorators love cute animal toppers (especially when they’re wearing aviator caps! What?! Ahh!), and any excuse to highlight them is definitely welcome. So here goes. Enjoy!

Here’s the final product:

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Now let’s see how we get there!

To begin, here’s a trade secret: when we make those toppers you folks love, a lot of the time, they’re made of Rice Krispie squares. Fondant is really quite heavy, so this allows us to have elaborate toppers without damaging the cake supporting them. So first, we mash the squares into the shape we want:

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Then, we cover the shape with melted white chocolate:

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After this, we’ll shave off the extra bumps. Sometimes – if we’re feeling particular about the shape being very smooth – we’ll cover it in modelling chocolate.

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Then I cover the ball in red modelling chocolate. I choose modeling chocolate for this particular topper because of its flexibility and ability to cover seams using your own body heat through your fingers.

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Then I do the same with the remaining shapes.

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You’ll notice that there is a skewer going through all the parts in the picture above; this ensures that the topper is secure. The skewer also goes through the styrofoam, much like it will in the cake, in order to hold the topper up, in its place.

Then, I add the details, using water to adhere them to each other.

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Another neat thing about modeling chocolate is that it hardens when cold. So I make the wings out of modeling chocolate, then freeze spray them to keep them in the desired position. I use chocolate brown petal dust to fill in the creases on the cap.

Then for the rainbow, I roll out pretty thin red fondant. Since it’s the top of the rainbow color, I want to use it as the base. I roll out thicker bands of each color, then cut them uniformly, using a metal pasta strip cutter that has been a lifesaver back here. Each band is adhered to the base using water.

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Once the cake has been buttercreamed and is sufficiently hardened, it’s time to put the decorations on, and voila! You now have a Pororo cake! Look at that cute little guy!

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Halloween Cupcakes & the Cookbook Winner

Tuesday, September 30th, 2008

Well, today I put in a lot of time trying out some new decorated cupcakes for Halloween, so get ready for lots of posts about Halloween/Fall cupcakes!  I know most of my readers like tutorials, so I took the extra time to document the creations step-by-step…hope you like them!  Before I go into the cupcakes though I want to announce the winner of The Perfect Scoop…it’s #11 DanaD!!! Congratulations Dana…just email me your contact information and I will ship the book off to you.  Now onto the cupcakes!  This first posting is going to be all about pumpkins and Fall leaves.  

These pumpkins are quite easy to make and can be decorated any way you like them.  You can leave them all one color (which would be the easiest route) or you can choose to make a multi color pumpkin like I did. Here are some photos of the process…

First you mix some fondant colors together…I choose two different color oranges, white, and sage green. To get the swirls you have to fold the fondant over itself and then stretch/roll it out.  Continue doing the fold over and stretching method until you get the look you want. Then roll the fondant into one or two balls (depending on the pumpkin you want).

Then using a toothpick make a hole in the top and make ridges on the side of the pumpkin.

Next, using a little brown fondant or modeling chocolate make the bark/stem and use the toothpick to make grooves into it to give it a realistic look.

Use a little green fondant to make the vines and then stack the pumpkins if you are doing a double decker. Brush on luster dust on the pumpkin if you have it to give it a shimmery look. 

Now onto the Fall leaf cupcake!  


This leaf was made with modeling chocolate, which is basically corn syrup and chocolate melted together and formed into a paste/dough.  It tastes sort of like a tootsie roll (not quite as good) and is very easy to work with.  It holds its shape pretty well and is easy to mold into figures.  So here is how you do it…

First you roll out the modeling chocolate to whatever size you want it…mine is about 1/8″ thick.  Then use a silicone impression to imprint the look of a real leaf onto the modeling chocolate.

Next, cut out the leaf shape with an x-acto knife and brush it with luster dust to give it a copper shine.


Definitely try these out, they are a lot of fun!  If you don’t have modeling chocolate you can use fondant or marzipan and they will work great too!

Get ready for some more Halloween cupcakes this week…watch out because they might get a little scary!

 


Two Cakes & The Cookbook Giveaway Winner

Monday, April 28th, 2008

Well, I am so excited to announce the winner of my first cookbook giveaway!  Thanks to all 35 people who participated in this little contest! When I put the info into the random number generator on my computer it said that the winner was….#2!!! Congratulations Landa from the All-Purpose Girl Blog! Your new Martha Stewart Cookie Book will be on its way shortly!Now onto the cakes!  This past weekend I had two events…one wedding and one birthday party. This was actually my first official wedding cake and I got to deliver it to the Queen Mary. The bride and groom were from England, which made it even more exciting, and came over to the U.S. just for their wedding. They were having a 1920′s theme wedding and so they sent me a picture of what they wanted the cake to look like. I put my own little twist on it and overall I was pretty happy with the outcome. The cake was carrot cake with cream cheese frosting and the top and bottom tier were covered in fondant, while the middle tier was covered in modeling chocolate. I used a technique called brushed embroidery to decorate the cake. First I made royal icing and colored it gold. Then I piped the design on freehand…basically I just looked at the photo that they sent me and tried to make a design similar to it. When piping I worked in segments…I piped on the royal icing and then used a small, wet paint brush and brushed the royal icing. I then let the icing dry. To get the glittery gold effect I used gold luster dust mixed it with a little vodka and painted over the piping to make it shimmer.  Lastly I piped a simple border of royal icing around the bases of the cake.

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The second event I had this weekend was a surprise birthday party where I made the appetizers and the cake.  The appetizers were Salmon Cakes with Lemon Dill Sauce, Bruschetta on Garlic Crostini, and Hot Parmesan Artichoke Dip with Pita Bread.  For the cake I made a chocolate cake with white chocolate whipped cream filling (see recipe below) and fresh strawberries and covered it with chocolate mousse buttercream.  As you can see from the photos of the cake, I have been getting more and more into using fresh flowers with my desserts.  I have the most adorable flower shop near my house and I love looking at their new flowers they get every day.  The theme for the party was “Tequila Sunrise” and so they wanted a cake with the colors pink, red, and orange.  I colored some vanilla buttercream I had red and piped a dot border around the edges of the cake and then used the same buttercream to pipe the birthday message.  To get the flowers to stick in the cake, I wrapped a skewer around the stem of the flower and secured it with floral tap.  Once I got to the party I was a little worried about the cake since we got a massive heat wave here in CA and it was around 90 degrees on Saturday…not so good for buttercream.  Thankfully it survived though!

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The recipe for white chocolate whipped cream is quite easy and only uses two ingredients: white chocolate and heavy cream

White Chocolate Whipped Cream

adapted from Fran Bigelow’s book, Pure Chocolate 

Makes 3 cups

6 oz white chocolate, finely chopped

1 1/2 cups heavy cream, chilled

Melt the chocolate in a microwave safe bowl, at 30 seconds intervals, stirring each time.  Let cool slightly.  Whip the cream to very soft peaks.  Working quickly, with a hand whisk add the lightly whipped cream all at once to the cooled melted chocolate.  (Don’t reverse the order, or chips will form.)  Whisk until thoroughly combined, but don’t overwhip or you will lose the smooth consistency.  Chilled until needed.

 

Sculpted Chef’s Head

Thursday, February 7th, 2008

Well, here is my 2nd cake from my trip to Chicago where I attended Bronwen Weber’s class at the French Pastry School.  Bronwen first made this cake for a chef’s conference…it was a chef’s head on a plate!   This cake was quite tricky since almost all of the face design is done by using your hands to sculpt the fondant covered cake into a realistic face before the fondant dries on you.  I hope you enjoy seeing the photos from the class and realize just how much of a cake genius Bronwen really is!

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The cake is started by stacking layer upon layer of cake & buttercream and then attempting to carve out the basic features of the face.

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These are the two carved heads…the first one is Bronwen’s & the second is mine.

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Next you cover the head in buttercream.

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After covering it in buttercream, you cover the whole cake in fondant and quickly, but carefully, shape the face with your hands.  Detail is added with gum paste tools.

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Here is my head after I finished the face sculpting part…then it was onto the details, like hair, eyebrows, sideburns, etc.  The hair accents were made out of modeling chocolate and the tie and jacket were made out of fondant.  Sadly, we ran out of time and didn’t get to make the chef’s hat, but it was an interesting technique.  Since the hat was made out of rice paper, it was completely edible (not that I would want to eat it!)

 

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And here is me with my chef’s head!

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